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Review Article

Fatigue Damage Modeling Techniques for Textile Composites: Review and Comparison With Unidirectional Composite Modeling Techniques

[+] Author and Article Information
R. D. B. Sevenois

Department of Materials Science
and Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering and Architecture,
Ghent University,
Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 903,
Zwijnaarde B-9052, Belgium
SIM Program M3Strength,
Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 935,
Zwijnaarde B-9052, Belgium
e-mail: ruben.sevenois@ugent.be

W. Van Paepegem

Professor
Department of Materials Science
and Engineering,
Faculty of Engineering and Architecture,
Ghent University,
Technologiepark Zwijnaarde 903,
Zwijnaarde B-9052, Belgium

1Corresponding author.

Manuscript received September 19, 2014; final manuscript received January 27, 2015; published online February 18, 2015. Assoc. Editor: Bart Prorok.

Appl. Mech. Rev 67(2), 020802 (Mar 01, 2015) (12 pages) Paper No: AMR-14-1079; doi: 10.1115/1.4029691 History: Received September 19, 2014; Revised January 27, 2015; Online February 18, 2015

Composite structural parts have been successfully introduced in high performance industries. Nowadays, also lower performance, high volume production industries are looking for the application of composites in their products. Especially attractive are textile composites (woven, braided, etc.) because of their better drapability and higher resistance to out-of-plane and dynamic loads. Currently, however, extensive mechanical tests are needed to properly design a composite structure. This is a requirement the large volume industries typically do not have the resources nor the time for. Reducing the need for structural tests can only be done if reliable simulation techniques are available. Simulation techniques for fatigue loading are particularly interesting because products generally have to perform their function over a period of time. For the textile structural composites concerned in this paper, some notable modeling techniques have been developed over the past 15 years. These techniques are presented here and the state of the art is established together with insights for future development by comparing the state of the art with the modeling techniques for laminates from unidirectional (UD) laminae.

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References

Figures

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Fig. 1

Microscopic investigation of the polished edges of a carbon-polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) satin weave. (a) Weft yarn damage; (b) broken axial fibers and meta-delamination; and (c) crack conjunction. (Reprinted with permission from Daggumati et al. [12]. Copyright 2013 by Elsevier).

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Fig. 2

Microscopic investigation of the polished edges of a carbon-PPS satin weave. (a) Interply delamination and (b) broken axial fibers and meta-delamination. (Reprinted with permission from Daggumati et al. [12]. Copyright 2013 by Elsevier).

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Fig. 3

Schematics of failure events in angle interlock specimens under monotonic compression. (Reprinted with permission from Cox et al. [13]. Copyright 1992 by Elsevier).

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Fig. 4

The formation of kink bands where a filler has been driven against a stuffer by a constraining warp weaver. (Reprinted with permission from Cox et al. [13]. Copyright 1992 by Elsevier).

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Fig. 5

Example of a constant life diagram. (Reprinted with permission from Kawai et al. [15]. Copyright 2012 by Elsevier).

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Fig. 6

Non-local failure criterion based on a FCV. (Reprinted with permission from Hochard et al. [55]. Copyright 2014 by Elsevier).

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