0
Review Article

Review of Residual Stress Modification Techniques for Extending the Fatigue Life of Metallic Aircraft Components

[+] Author and Article Information
M. Sticchi

Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht,
Institute of Materials Research,
Material Mechanics,
Max-Planck-Straße 1,
Geesthacht D-21502, Germany
e-mail: marianna.sticchi@hzg.de

D. Schnubel, N. Kashaev, N. Huber

Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht,
Institute of Materials Research,
Material Mechanics,
Max-Planck-Straße 1,
Geesthacht D-21502, Germany

Manuscript received September 10, 2013; final manuscript received July 31, 2014; published August 25, 2014. Assoc. Editor: Bart Prorok.

Appl. Mech. Rev 67(1), 010801 (Aug 25, 2014) (9 pages) Paper No: AMR-13-1071; doi: 10.1115/1.4028160 History: Received September 10, 2013; Revised July 31, 2014

A major challenge for the aircraft industry in the future will be the development of effective strategies for maintaining and extending the service life of aging aircraft fleet. In this context, residual-stress-based approaches for extending the fatigue life of aircraft components are believed to have great potential for providing cost-effective solutions. This paper reviews residual-stress-based life extension techniques and published work on the use of these techniques in aerospace applications. The techniques reviewed include cold expansion, shot peening, laser shock peening, deep rolling, and heating. Comparisons of the various techniques with regard to current applications and limitations are given.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2015 by ASME
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 1

(a) Principle of the split-sleeve cold expansion process and (b) the resulting residual stress state following cold expansion [3,8]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 2

(a) Principle of the shot peening process and (b) the resulting residual stress state following shot peening [1,12]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 3

(a) Principle of the laser shock peening process and (b) the resulting residual stress state following laser shock peening [1,22]

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 4

Principle of the low-plasticity burnishing process and the resulting residual stress state. Illustration reproduced by permission from “Low Plasticity Burnishing,” August 23, 2013.1 Copyright 2013 by Lambda Technologies Group.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 5

Principle of the deep-rolling process. Illustration reproduced by permission from Tolga Bozdana, 2005, “On the Mechanical Surface Enhancement Techniques in Aerospace Industry–A Review of Technology,” Int. J. Aircr. Eng. Aerosp. Technol., 77(4), pp. 279–292. Copyright 2005 by ECOROLL AG.

Grahic Jump Location
Fig. 6

(a) Principle of the heating process and (b) the resulting residual stress state following heating with a heat source travelling in the y-direction [57-59]

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In