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REVIEW ARTICLES

Vibration of Delaminated Composite Laminates: A Review

[+] Author and Article Information
Christian N. Della

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798

Dongwei Shu

School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798mdshu@ntu.edu.sg

Appl. Mech. Rev 60(1), 1-20 (Jan 01, 2007) (20 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2375141 History:

Fiber reinforced composite laminates are increasingly replacing traditional metallic materials. The manufacturing process and service of the composite laminates frequently lead to delamination. Vibration analysis is an integral part of most engineering structures. In the present article we provide a relevant survey on the various analytical models and numerical analyses for the free vibration of delaminated composites. A basic understanding of the influence of the delamination on the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of composite laminates is presented. In addition, other factors affecting the vibration of the delaminated composites are discussed. Particular attention is given to composite laminates having piezoelectric sensors and actuators, and ones subjected to axial loadings.

Copyright © 2007 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
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References

Figures

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Figure 1

Modeling of a beam with a single through-width delamination (from Mujumdar and Suryanarayan (19), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 2

Deformation and stress components in the delamination region: (a) deformation and stresses with the layers free to slide; (b) deformation and stresses when the compatibility of axial displacement is satisfied (from Mujumdar and Suryanarayan (19), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 3

Modeling of the delamination region for the “constrained mode”: (a) deformation in the “constrained mode”; (b) contact pressure between the layers of the delamination region (from Mujumdar and Suryanarayan (19), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 4

Deformation of section B between delamination and integral regions showing “rigid connector” and “soft connector” (from Shu and Mai (38), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 5

Delaminated beam modeled by beam finite elements (from Zak (48), with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media)

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Figure 6

A typical finite element mesh for a delaminated beam (from Ju (49), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 7

Schematic showing “penalty parameter/stiff spring” connections (from Campanelli and Engblom (52), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 8

Delaminated plate modeled by finite elements (from Krawczuk (47), with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media)

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Figure 9

Finite element mesh of composite plates with rectangular delaminations (from Ju (55), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 10

Kinematic assumptions of the layerwise theory: (a) laminate; (b) displacements (from Saravanos and Hopkins (67), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 11

Model of a delaminated plate for continuous analysis (from Chang (124))

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Figure 12

Effect of thickness-wise location on the fundamental frequency of a clamped-clamped beam with a central delamination (from Mujumdar and Suryanarayan (19), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 13

Influence of modes and connectors (from Shu (37), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 14

Thicknesswise location of delamination in the composite beam (from Shen and Grady (26))

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Figure 15

Variation of natural frequency with length to thickness ratio of undelaminated plate (from Chattopadhyay (95))

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Figure 16

Variation of natural frequency with delamination length with plate length to thickness ratio of 15.7 (from Chattopadhyay (95))

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Figure 17

Effect of the delamination length on the fundamental and second mode frequencies of the beam (from Mujumdar and Suryanarayan (19), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 18

Changes in the natural frequencies of delaminated composite cantilever beams: (a) fundamental frequency; (b) second bending frequency; (c) third bending frequency (from Zak (48), with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media)

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Figure 19

Changes in the natural frequencies of delaminated composite cantilever plates: (a) fundamental frequency; (b) second bending frequency; (c) third bending frequency (from Zak (48), with kind permission of Springer Science and Business Media)

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Figure 20

The effect of the delamination on the natural frequencies is more pronounced at higher modes (from Jian (125))

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Figure 21

Opening mode of the delaminated beam: (a) fundamental frequency; (b) second bending frequency (from Lestari and Hanagud (27), reprinted by permission of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.)

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Figure 22

Delamination opening increases with more restrained at the beam edges (from Shu (37), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 23

Natural frequencies versus fiber angle for [0∕θ]s composites containing one and two delaminations (from Lee (69), reprinted with permission from Elsevier)

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Figure 24

Deformed shape of the finite element meshes (from Thornburg and Chattopadhyay (144))

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Figure 25

(a) Error from neglect of crack tip singularity; (b) error from neglect of crack tip singularity for varying delamination locations (from Thornburg and Chattopadhyay (144))

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