0
REVIEW ARTICLES

Particle-Turbulence Interaction in a Homogeneous, Isotropic Turbulent Suspension

[+] Author and Article Information
Christian Poelma

Laboratory for Aero- and Hydrodynamics, J.M. Bergerscentrum, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft, The Netherlands

Gijs Ooms1

Laboratory for Aero- and Hydrodynamics, J.M. Bergerscentrum, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft, The Netherlandsg.ooms@wbmt.tudelft.nl

1

To whom correspondence should be addressed.

Appl. Mech. Rev 59(2), 78-90 (Mar 01, 2006) (13 pages) doi:10.1115/1.2130361 History:

A review is given of numerical, analytical, and experimental research regarding the two-way coupling effect between particles and fluid turbulence in a homogeneous, isotropic turbulent suspension. The emphasis of this review is on the effect of the suspended particles on the spectrum of the carrier fluid, in order to explain the physical mechanisms that are involved. An important result of numerical simulations and analytical models (neglecting the effect of gravity) is that, for a homogeneous and isotropic suspension with particles with a response time much larger than the Kolmogorov time scale, the main effect of the particles is suppression of the energy of eddies of all sizes. However for a suspension with particles with a response time comparable to or smaller than the Kolmogorov time, the Kolmogorov length scale will decrease and the turbulence energy of (nearly) all eddy sizes increases. For a suspension with particles with a response time in between the two limiting cases mentioned above the energy of the larger eddies is suppressed, whereas the energy of the smaller ones is enhanced. Attention is paid to several physical mechanisms that were suggested in the literature to explain this influence of the particles on the turbulence. In some of the experimental studies, certain results from simulations and models have, indeed, been confirmed. However, in other experiments these results were not found. This is attributed to the role of gravity, which leads to turbulence production by the particles. Additional research effort is needed to fully understand the physical mechanisms causing the two-way coupling effect in a homogeneous, isotropic, and turbulently flowing suspension. This review contains 47 references.

FIGURES IN THIS ARTICLE
<>
Copyright © 2006 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 1

Effect of mass loading on spatial energy spectra for (τp∕τk=1.5). With increasing mass loading the energy at large wave numbers increases relative to the energy at small wave numbers. From Ref. 5.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 2

Turbulence kinetic energy spectrum for τp∕τk=1.26:ϕ=0 (solid line), 0.2 (dotted), 0.5 (dashed), and 1.0 (dashed-dotted). With increasing mass loading the energy at large wave numbers is enhanced relative to the energy at small wave numbers. Data taken from Ref. 9.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 3

Turbulence kinetic energy spectrum for τp∕τk=11.38:ϕ=0 (solid line), 0.2 (dotted), 0.5 (dashed), and 1.0 (dashed-dotted). With increasing mass loading the energy at all wave numbers decreases. Data taken Ref. 9.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 4

Kinetic energy spectrum of the carrier fluid at t=5.0. The cross-over wave number increases with increasing particle response time. From Ref. 11.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 5

Scaled energy spectra (E=E(k)∕(ϵ2∕3η5∕3)) of the single-phase simulations (dotted) and two-phase simulations (continuous). The wavenumber is made dimensionless with the particle wave number: kp=2π∕dp. ϕ=0.005, ρp∕ρf=1.414, StK=0.207. Data taken from Ref. 13.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 6

Turbulent kinetic energy spectrum of the carrier fluid (τ≈1.5). The cross-over wave number increases with increasing particle response time in accordance with numerical simulations. From Ref. 22.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 7

Influence of mass load on decay of turbulent kinetic energy; 0.65mm glass particles in water. Reproduced from Ref. 38.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 8

Longitudinal spectrum for unladen and laden flow; 0.65mm neutrally buoyant particles in water. Reproduced from Ref. 38.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 9

Decay of turbulent kinetic energy for particle-free and particle-laden flow. Data taken from Ref. 39.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 10

Smoothened energy spectra for single-phase (ϕ=0) and particle-laden (ϕ=0.005) flows. Data taken from Ref. 39.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 11

Decay of the axial (streamwise) and transversal kinetic energy for single-phase and particle laden case: left: ϕ=0.37%, right: ϕ=2.67%. Data replotted from Ref. 40.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 12

Decay of the axial (streamwise) and transversal kinetic energy for single-phase and particle laden case. ϕ=4.99%. Data replotted from Ref. 40.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 13

Decay of axial and transversal kinetic energy for single-phase and particle-laden case (ψ=0.1%, ϕ=0.38%, dp=280μm, ρp∕ρf=3.8). Data taken from Ref. 42.

Grahic Jump Location
Figure 14

Turbulence level modification by 1.0mm glass particles in water as function of volume concentration, Rep=140. Data taken from Ref. 41.

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In