0
REVIEW ARTICLES: Particle-Turbulence Interaction

Simulation of Interactions Between Microbubbles and Turbulent Flows

[+] Author and Article Information
M. R. Maxey

Center for Fluid Mechanics, Turbulence and Computation, Box 1966, Brown University, Providence RI 02912

E. J. Chang

Naval Research Laboratory, Code 64-10, 4555 Overlook Ave SW, Washington DC 20375

L. -P. Wang

Department of Mechanical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park PA 16802

Appl. Mech. Rev 47(6S), S70-S74 (Jun 01, 1994) doi:10.1115/1.3124443 History: Online April 29, 2009

Abstract

Microbubbles formed by small air bubbles in water are characterized as spherical inclusions that are essentially rigid due to the effects of surfactants, and respond to the action of drag forces and added-mass effects from the motion relative to the surrounding fluid. Direct numerical simulations of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence are used to study the effects of the small-scale, dissipation range turbulence on microbubble transport and in particular the average rise velocity of microbubbles. It is found that microbubbles rise significantly more slowly than in still fluid even in the absence of a mean flow, due to a strong interaction with the small-scale vorticity. The way in which microbubbles might modify the underlying turbulence by the variations in their local distribution is discussed for dilute, dispersed systems and some estimates for the enhanced viscous dissipation given.

Copyright © 1994 by American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Your Session has timed out. Please sign back in to continue.

References

Figures

Tables

Errata

Discussions

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging and repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles
Related eBook Content
Topic Collections

Sorry! You do not have access to this content. For assistance or to subscribe, please contact us:

  • TELEPHONE: 1-800-843-2763 (Toll-free in the USA)
  • EMAIL: asmedigitalcollection@asme.org
Sign In